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Scott Davidoff | Group Manager

Scott Davidoff

Dr. Scott Davidoff manages Human Interfaces for Mission Operations at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. As principal investigator for NASA's Space Networking and Mission Automation program, he leads design and development of JPL's next-gen robot and spacecraft controls. As principal investigator of JPL's Data-to-Discovery program, he leads efforts to create new ways to interrogate and interact with planetary scale datasets. Dr. Davidoff serves on steering committees for the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, and the Association for Computing Machinery. Across his over 18 years of experience, he has introduced numerous lightweight prototyping methods that have become industry standard software practice. Dr. Davidoff has a Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction, an MS in Computer Science (research), and an M.HCI in Human-Computer Interaction (practice), all from Carnegie Mellon.

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Adam Coleman

Adam Coleman

Since childhood, Adam Coleman has always enjoyed observing the stars and learning about science and astronomy. Joining the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1999, he has been a lead developer of Graphical User Interfaces across many space missions, supporting spacecraft commanding, and the visualization of spacecraft telemetry. He enjoys learning new web technologies, and applying them to the various web applications he supports.

Alex Menzies

Alex Menzies

Alex Menzies is a software engineer with a passion for taking the fiction out of science-fiction. Since joining the lab in 2007 he has worked on a variety of projects. Currently, he is investigating novel interfaces for controlling high degree of freedom mobile robots with time delay. Some of his other projects include a terrain engine capable of rending multi-gigapixel HiRISE mosaics in real-time over the web, a new Cloud Fraction by Altitude science data product for the MISR mission, and "Mars Rover Landing" -- NASA's first console game. In his spare time he enjoys hacking on new technology, cycling, and attempting to surf.

In the News: Simulation: A Panel on NASA Armature, Robotics and Serious Gaming | NASA's Got Game - PAX

Bach Bui

Bach Bui

Bach Bui is a senior computer scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Joining JPL since 1993, he has been working in the Deep Space Network (DSN). He has been serving as Cognizant Design Engineer for a number of tasks including DSN SPS UIP and SPS SDL, DSN NMC Next Gen Monitor & Control Displays. He's been working as lead software designer for NMC Automated Link Build and Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal. His areas of interest range from software data system, persistent mechanism, geographic information system, web services to mobile applications.

Bryan Duran

Bryan Duran

Bryan Duran has been a software engineer at JPL since 2011 with a background in game development. His previous work with the Microsoft Kinect sensor led him to find JPL. JPL has many projects involving technologies such as the Kinect, so it was an easy transition for him. For Bryan's first year, he had been mainly working on Mars Public Outreach projects including the "Mars Rover Landing" game on Xbox Live and several online 3D experiences designed to educate the public about Mars and the newly landed rover, Curiosity. Currently, he is working on the Human Robotic Systems project in designing and creating natural interfaces for controlling robots with many degrees of freedom.

In the News: NASA's Got Game - PAX

Garrett Johnson

Garrett Johnson

Garrett Johnson joined JPL doing software engineering and interaction design in 2012 with a background in game design and development. He works primarily on the Human Robotic Systems project, researching innovative ways to remotely control robotic systems, including the high-degree of freedom robot, ATHLETE. Currently, he is working on ways to mitigate the negative effects of moderate time delay while remotely driving rovers, as well as designing software to manipulate a 36 degree of freedom robot using a stereo display and 6 degree of freedom stylus.

In the News: Simulation: A Panel on NASA Armature, Robotics and Serious Gaming 

Jesse Kriss

Jesse Kriss

Jesse Kriss is a software developer and designer specializing in the areas of information visualization, human-computer interaction, web development, and collaborative systems. He has worked on a wide range of projects, from the web-based Many Eyes collaborative visualization platform to an art installation at the San Jose International Airport involving live fish and computer vision, to the technology team for the Obama reelection campaign. At JPL, Jesse contributes to the research and design process, advises on technical architecture for web platforms, and develops advanced user interfaces.

Mark Powell

Mark Powell

Mark Powell is a senior computer scientist in the Human Interfaces group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since 2001 Mark has designed, led and implemented software systems to support robotic exploration of earth, sea, air, space and the planets. He co-developed the Science Activity Planner operations interface for the Mars Exploration Rover mission which received the NASA Software of the Year Award in 2004. He served as Cognizant Engineer (Product Lead) of the primary activity planning software for the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission from 2009 to 2012. Currently Mark is leading software design and development efforts in support of Earth science collaboration using the cloud and the development and use of mobile and web applications in Mars rover operations and public outreach. Mark's areas of interest include visualization, agile development with design and Scrum, mobile applications, mapping, image processing and 3D graphics.

In the News: Grand Challenges of Human-Robot Interaction in Space 

Tom Crockett

Tom Crockett

Tom Crockett is a computer scientist and engineer who has developed mission operations software at JPL since 2005. One of his first projects was to design and develop a tiled image viewer which allows smoothly panning and zooming around extremely large images, such as the stitched panoramas taken by robots on other planets. He also developed a system for creating and sharing annotations on top of such images, to facilitate collaborative planning. For the Mars Science Laboratory he created an integrated development environment (IDE) for developing robot command sequences, exploiting the close analogy between robot sequencing and programming. His technical interests include programming languages, data visualization, concurrency and armchair math.

Victor Luo

Victor Luo

Working with other NASA centers, Victor is leading the development of natural user interface technologies for commanding robot navigation and dexterous manipulation. In addition, Mr. Luo is managing partnerships with Mars Outreach and commercial vendors to create STEM-related interactive applications. Past experiences include planning & commanding of Mars spacecraft, operations of fractionated spacecraft, and 3D visualization of Mars terrain and rover telemetry.

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Past Interns

Viirj Kan

Viirj Kan

Viirj Kan is an experienced designer and researcher with an interest in interactive environments and haptic interfaces. At JPL, she is researching to develop a common language between humans and robots — whether it be gestural, spoken, haptic, or textual. Working primarily on the Human Robotic Systems project, she is currently working on a natural user experience to teleoperate Robonaut 2 for dexterous manipulation tasks within medium time delay.